Tagged: SpyParty

SpyParty And Restraint, Or: How I Learned To Ignore Biology And Love Fourth Down

Playing NFL Blitz on the neighborhood N64I was one of those awful kids who picked “Da Bomb” almost every play. I was capable of complex running maneuvers and comfortable with the intricacies of fakes, screens, and rushes (ok I don’t actually know football) but it was that long-shot Hail Mary and its exaggerated payoff – and extravagant risk – that really rattled my adolescent adrenal glands.

Needless to say I failed to convert a bunch of fourth downs.

Long coddled and damp in the blubber of “adulthood,” those fight-or-flight organs shriek with electricity again as I take my place in the early-access beta for SpyParty, Chris Hecker’s irresponsibly brilliant social experiment turned cat-and-mouse battle of wits — a game a little bit like a slow-motion fourth-and-long, except people die.

SpyParty Spy Swapping Statue

Actually the game is very unlike a football match — except in its distinct phases of offense and defense — and it is very unlike me to lean on a sports analogy, so here’s The Point: SpyParty’s tense espionage conveys that same all-or-nothing anxiety while rewarding the punt fake over the long pass. In other words, the game tells you have one shot (truly, as the Sniper) and while that makes you want to scramble and sprint, to be that kid who plays “Da Bomb” and gets it over with, you will be mercilessly punished for anything more brazen than a brisk promenade. That drives the kid in me crazy, and I love it.

If you’re unfamiliar, SpyParty is a two-player game of deceit and surveillance set at one upper-crust gala or another. One player controls the spy, whose mission may include contacting a double agent, tapping the ambassador, planting microfilm in a book, swapping one statue for another, etc. The trick is making it look natural — the computer-controlled guests will read books, admire statues and chat up the ambassador, so barring a few subtle animation “tells,” the spy can make their missions look like natural mingling.

Basically you’re asked to act like AI, a task with rich technical and thematic potential — all of which has been more fully explored elsewhere, so, onwards.

Continue reading